Wireless Router

Discussion in 'Networking, Internet, Web Applications & The Cloud' started by EzyStvy, Dec 1, 2017.

  1. EzyStvy

    EzyStvy Computing Professor Staff Member

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    /rant - OMG there are a lot of routers out there to choose from. I'd read articles about "Ten Best" and no two sites would list the same routers etc....

    Anyway, I'm probably going to be getting this puppy:

    NETGEAR - Nighthawk AC1900 Dual-Band Wi-Fi Router - Black
    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/netgea...nd-wi-fi-router-black/1754208.p?skuId=1754208

    Networking is a weak spot for me...Part of the reason for going with Netgear is that it'll be replacing a 7 year'ish Netgear router. I've been into the settings a lot recently and just today made screenshots of all of my current settings.

    QUESTION: In theory, do you think a medium noob like me will be able to get it up and running? I plan on hooking it up early in the morning before the rest of my co-workers get in.. I won't wall mount it till I'm certain it works....If things go badly, I should be able to pull the two wires out and put them back in the old router.

    We're just an eight person office with mainly the Boss lady using wireless for her laptop and we have a wireless printer.

    Speaking of printers, the second printer is wired... In all likelihood, will the IP address change for both printers? Is there a way to prevent that?

    Dual-Band - will I probably be able to figure that out? From what I understand, any wireless computer should be on the better 5GHz band...

    Any thoughts or Tips n Tricks?

    (we're getting the new router due to the old one dropping connections off and on all day long)
     
  2. Jbc223456

    Jbc223456

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    Don't have much experience with the Netgear, but it's supposedly a decent router. I currently have this fella:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00S9SGNNS/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    It covers my 2800sqft home (located in basement at the corner of the home). I have no issues connecting anywhere in my home, as well as outside doing yard work in either the front or back yard. I've been very satisfied with this router.

    Without knowing what kind of network configuration you have, it would be hard to predict how easy or difficult it would be. I am going to say it would be fairly easy for you. You're more intelligent than some of the IT folks I've spoken with, so I don't think you'll have an issue. Regarding the printers, it would be more helpful to know how they were set up. For example, I have a Brother monochrome laser printer (wireless) that I have set up. If you set up the printer(s) to use a static IP address, that will make migrating it to the new router that much easier - simply go into your printer settings after the switch, and update the SSID and password for the new router. If they are set as DHCP, you're going to have a more difficult time, since they will more than likely change their IP addresses. A remedy to this would be to set up the printers to have a static IP address.

    Dual-Band uses both the 5GHz and 2.5GHz frequencies. There is increased throughput on the 5GHz band with one caveat - it is much more susceptible to interference and terrain (i.e. it doesn't travel well through multiple concrete walls). If they are within 30ft of the router they will more than likely be better served on the 5GHz band. Any further and I would probably suggest connecting to the 2.5GHz for stability.

    After setting up the system, I would suggest using an app of some sort to see how the coverage in the office is. I like using this app on my Nexus 5x: GitHub - VREMSoftwareDevelopment/WiFiAnalyzer: Android application to analyze WiFi signals.. Note, this link is to their public github repository. You can go to the Play Store and download the app from there. Just make sure it is from that author (there are several lookalikes).

    Another tip - screenshot and look at every page of the old router. I can't tell you how many times I've got myself in a pickle setting up wireless networks with a new router and then users weren't able to access some shared server or something because I've missed some obscure setting in the router firewall.
     
  3. EzyStvy

    EzyStvy Computing Professor Staff Member

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    Thanks for the feedback.

    I first started looking at ASUS based on some of your posts... Long story short - I'm going to stick with Netgear.. Everywhere I went and no matter which router I looked at, people either love or hate any router.

    One printer is wired and the other wireless and I'm sure they're using DHCP...since I didn't assign them an IP. I should be able to set the wireless one like you instructed.

    I already have the Web Analyser app. Was looking to extenders a few weeks ago... The boss's desk is in the Green..but on the low end. (she is the furthest away at about 100 feet - walls are all sheetrock - but she does have extra noise insulation on the wall between her desk and the router)

    And I have a ton of screenshots... Trying to decide if I should empty out the color ink cartridges by printing the shots out. LOL

    THANKS
     
  4. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    I always use static IP's for printers. The only hassle will be if the new router is not on the same subnet as the old, but you can change the router internal IP so it is the same.

    Installing a printer with a static IP is easy - you use the add printer wizard, LOCAL (not network) printer. Add a standard TCP/IP port with the static IP. Most printers can be assigned a static IP through its control panel.
     
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  5. EzyStvy

    EzyStvy Computing Professor Staff Member

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    New Netgear Router is up and running...

    First big hurdle was that it assumed I'm a home user and Static IP's are RARE. After telling it many times I've rebooted the modem and fixed the cat5 etc...it still wasn't finding the internet. I went ahead and told it to go NEXT and found the spot for the Static IP info... YEA

    Next issue was our file server that had/has a static internal IP... Took a while but I fixed that.

    Gave the wireless printer the new SSID info and all is well with that. Only have to tweak the port number on the wired printer per each pc.... I guess I need to figure how to make certain it doesn't change. I'm thinking if I power cycle it, it might grab a different IP...

    Thanks for the feedback.
     
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  6. Jbc223456

    Jbc223456

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    If it's set up for DHCP, if the printer is off for any period of time, you will almost always get a different IP. In my router, I have set up the DHCP pool to be from .101-.254, and allow my static pool to be chosen from .2-.100.

    I would definitely look at assigning a static IP for the two printers.
     
  7. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    I was not talking about a static real world IP, unless that's what your company is using. I was referring to setting the printers to static local (internal) IP.
     
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  8. EzyStvy

    EzyStvy Computing Professor Staff Member

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    Thanks... I will go looking for the way to assign the IP for the wired printer...

    On an interesting Note - Window 10 computers could find the printer at it's new 192.168.1.4 address...

    EDIT: that was quick:
    Advanced > LAN Setup > Address Reservation.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
  9. robrpb

    robrpb

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    glc, I would appreciate it if you would make a sticky thread for the procedure on how to setup a wireless printer with a static IP. It would be helpful to me and probably others too. Thanks. Rob
     
  10. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Sticky not really feasible, because it varies widely with different printer models. Procedures should be in the printer manual.
     
  11. robrpb

    robrpb

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    Okay, thanks glc. I just thought that the basics were the same with minor differences.
     
  12. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    The only thing that's common is you assign a static IP in the router subnet but preferably outside the DHCP scope. Example - router is 192.168.1.1 and DHCP is from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.149 (as is mine), assign it 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.99 or 192.168.1.150 to 192.168.1.254. I assigned my HP Ethernet wired laser printer 192.168.1.222 through the printer's control panel. In Windows, I added a standard TCP/IP local port at that address using the Add Printer wizard, then picked the printer model to install on that port. Printers that do not have a control panel and/or do not have built-in Windows drivers have to be handled differently.

    My son in law has a Canon multifunction wireless inkjet - the only way to set that one up was by using the printer CD. It installs a Canon BJ port. It won't work on a standard TCP/IP port even if you set it static in the control panel.
     
  13. robrpb

    robrpb

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    Thanks glc for the lesson. I now have a little better understanding.