researchgate

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Blaster3, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. Blaster3

    Blaster3

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    https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org...take-formal-steps-force-copyright-compliance/

    interesting article, researchgate is actively scanning networks (worldwide) for anyone viewing "too much" content (previously made public) and then locking them out until you sign up with them, where you can then view that same content for free anyways...

    this is what i got after viewing several articles, from several different sites, on the web (all with similar subject matter)...

    upload_2017-11-14_10-54-32.png

    EDIT: note that i didn't copy/paste/save any material/content, rather, i bookmarked several of those sites/links... afterwhich, i was locked out...
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
  2. reggie14

    reggie14

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    People actually like ResearchGate? As someone who occasionally writes papers, I used to get heavy spam from ResearchGate trying to get me to sign up. I pretty much immediately wrote them off since then.

    Anyways, you seem to be raising two different points. The article you linked to is about publishers complaining that ResearchGate facilitates free access to published works. This is copyright infringement- in many, many cases, authors must pass the copyright to the publishers. While most publishers don't seem to mind authors privately providing free copies to colleagues, and many are willing to look the other way when researchers post copies on their personal websites, they're not going to like a for-profit company taking those works and posting them on its ad-supported site. In some cases, ResearchGate even modifies the published works, removing information from the publisher.

    Obviously we could debate the merits of the claims here. I happen to work in a field that has moved heavily to an "open access" model where nearly all papers are available for free (I also work in a field where the most significant results are presented at conferences, rather than published in journals). Not all fields have done that, although that seems to be the general trend across the sciences. At least in my field, the publishers aren't well-liked. They're viewed as a necessary evil by professors that need to publish to get tenure.

    In any event, the publishers have a valid legal right to complain about RG redistributing their copyrighted works.

    You ran into a different problem, where RG soft-blocks IPs that have been accessing too many pages. While I don't doubt that RG views this as a nice opportunity to get people to sign up, they probably have a legitimate concern here over website scrappers. Other entities are automatically downloading content from RG, and posting it on their own ad-supported pages. They don't even bother to remove the references to RG when they do this, so I assume the whole process is automated. Given a lot of RG's material similarly "stolen" from the publishers, I find this sort of ironic. Nonetheless, I imagine part of the block is done to make things more difficult for scrappers.
     
  3. Blaster3

    Blaster3

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    @reggie, soft blocking usually is due to viewing too many articles/pages from the same source, that is not what happened with me... after visiting, and subsequently, bookmarking some links/pages, i then came upon an article within researchgate's site, clicked on it, and immediately got the blocking message... how is that possible when it was the first time i ever visited a link from them... did they view my recent history in firefox? did they get that info from duckduckgo? startpage? did those other sites have hidden shareable tracking within their session cookies?

    i wouldn't/didn't sign up with researchgate, nor will i ever visit any links tied to them... it's disturbing that they somehow knew what i was researching...
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
  4. mbossman2

    mbossman2 I am, in reality, a moose Staff Member

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    I use a lot of these services for my masters.

    RG's big plus is that they are easier to use than many of the academic search tools (like JSTOR).
     
  5. reggie14

    reggie14

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    Websites can't view your recent history. Now, if ResearchGate partnered with the other websites you were browsing, they potentially could track you through cookies, but I doubt that's what's going on here.

    So, what happened? I don't know. Maybe you inadvertently browsed to ResearchGate pages, but didn't realize it. Or maybe your IP address was previously held by someone that used ResearchGate a lot. Maybe your ISP uses carrier-grade NAT instead of handing out publicly-routable IPs. Or maybe just the right set of events triggered some sort of bug (or perhaps intended behavior) to pressure you into signing up for an account early.