Nvidia Graphic Cards and Shield K1

Discussion in 'Gaming and Benchmarks' started by auen1, Oct 25, 2016.

  1. auen1

    auen1

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    I have a Nvidia Shield K1 "gaming" tablet.
    https://shield.nvidia.com/tablet/k1\
    I bought it as a monitor for my drone, because the needed app requires a fairly strong cpu (and the gpu helps too).

    Since it's supposed to be a gaming tablet and as I am not a gamer, I thought I'd try tonight, to learn more about it.
    Any advice will be much appreciated!

    It looks like the tablet can pair up with my Nvidia GC and stream through my computer, possibly using the computers GPU as well, (for gaming).
    Maybe use my cpu, too, I really have no idea.
    The GC seems to want to connect to my tablet.


    I've never played a PC game.
    Nvidia has a bunch of games on their site.
    Are they all streaming games, MMO's?
    My data limits prevent me from playing on line games, I think.
    Games & Apps | GeForce

    Anyhow, I'm doing more research on line.
    I have about 0% experience gaming,
    just looking for anyone who may have helpful advice.

    THANKS!
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
  2. auen1

    auen1

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    I think I figured out this part.
    It's called "Gamestream"
    Play PC Games on TV with NVIDIA GameStream | SHIELD Blog

    NVIDIA GameStream: Play PC Games on NVIDIA SHIELD

    It basically allows you to play PC games, running on your PC and casting it to your tablet, via WIFI (or the internet, (I haven't tested that)).
    If I understand correctly, I could play a PC game installed on my computer, using the PC's CPU/GPU, on my tablet a 1,000 miles away.:rolleyes:
    I think that you are supposed to play games that can use the Shield "x-box" style controller, or a BT keyboard/mouse.

    It also can cast any program or even your desktop.

    1 ms delay, measured by the tablet, not bad if accurate.
    Advertised HD 1080p @60 fps,
    sounds unbelievable for WIFI or internet casting.
    ---------------------------------------
    Also says in the specs that its:
    "4K Ultra-HD Ready"
    ---------------------------------------
    If it can really do all that ^^, it's pretty impressive for a $200 tablet.


    20161025_000700[2].jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
  3. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    Create a Steam account. You then download games directly from the internet. It's really easy. Steam also has big discounts on games, especially during the holidays. You can then also buy a game and load it onto multiple computers....you just can't play the same game at the same time on different computers, unless you play offline. Steam also automatically updates patches for games. Steam also sells more than game software...utility software for example.

    Steam is a lot less hassle than buying games by purchasing CD's or DVD's. I have over 100 games on Steam. Been really happy with them.
     
  4. Sound Mind

    Sound Mind

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    You also need a compatible graphics card. You would need a GTX 650, 750, 950, 1050, or higher.

    There's two different services. The one you should avoid is the paid service called GeForce Now. It's a paid service where you can play a game, streaming from nVidia's servers. Requires a lot of upstream and downstream traffic, and if you have a data cap, it's toast. The experience I've heard is pretty rubbish besides, unless you happen to live a couple miles from an nVidia server.

    However, GameStream is the thing you're talking about. Your desktop is playing the game and streaming the audio/video over your home network to your tablet where you're doing your inputs. Your tablet is basically just acting as a remote connection to your gaming PC. This is all done over your home network, so no internet access is required, and your data cap won't be an issue. Just so long as your computer and the tablet are on the same network, you're golden. For optimal performance, your desktop would have a wired connection to the router your tablet is logged onto to minimize latency.

    This only works locally, though. You can't fire up your gaming PC and stream to your tablet if you're down the block or a few towns over. Local network only. As far as I know, such a service doesn't exist yet. And if it did, it would toast your data cap.

    Basically, it's a substitute for setting up your gaming PC in your living room if you want to play games on your big-screen TV. Or it's a way to play PC games in bed. Things like that.
     
  5. auen1

    auen1

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    Thanks!

    I noticed that Wikipedia mentions the Shield. (Link below)
    Says it gets its wifi speed from wifi direct.

    I've heard of some pretty high speeds, 250-500mbs range?

    Can a router use wifi direct efficiently?
    I have no idea and just wondering,
    I thought that wifi direct was supposed to go directly to the device and not the router?
    (I know very little about wifi direct, except that W8/10 has it, along with some phones and other devices. And it's fast).

    Wi-Fi Direct - Wikipedia

    Thanks again for the great advice, guys!
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2016
  6. reggie14

    reggie14

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    Wifi Direct is basically a faster alternative to Bluetooth that uses the same protocol as wireless internet to connect computers/tablets to peripherals in a peer-to-peer manner.

    In the case of the Shield, it uses Wifi Direct to connect to the game controllers. Some Roku streamers also use Wifi Direct to connect to their controllers.