New PC Build (Custom) - Help please

Discussion in 'Build Your Own PC' started by Rg Edit, Oct 6, 2017.

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  1. SpencerC

    SpencerC

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    Considering that the i3 is nothing more than a rehashed 7600k wouldn't be a better idea to just buy Kaby Lake and overclock it instead of trying to get your hands on Coffee Lake right now?
     
  2. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Remember, overclocking is for enthusiasts, not "common" users.
     
  3. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    Doesn't it depend on how far you want to take an overclock?

    There is no-brainer software built into motherboards UEFI's that allow for mild "safe" overclocks.
     
  4. SpencerC

    SpencerC

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    Nowadays, overclocking is not hard at all. Just enter your BIOS and set your multiplier and you are set.
     
  5. reggie14

    reggie14

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    Given that, if you're just looking for a quad-core, why buy a Core i5 7600k for $239 when you can buy a Core i3 8350k for $180?

    I'm not sure why you're talking about overclocking. The Coffee Lake chips aren't really clocked higher.

    The new i3 isn't exactly the same as the old i5. The Coffee Lake i3 chips don't have turbo speeds, so they tend to have slightly slower peak frequencies than their Kaby Lake Core i5 counterparts.

    For what it's worth, I agree that Hyperthreading/SMT is a little overrated. Whether it provides any benefits is extremely application-specific (even specific to to the particular functions in that applications). The cynic in me says that hyperthreading is mostly good for multi-tasking and poorly-optimized multi-threaded programs. Hyperthreading doesn't actually make CPUs any more powerful, strictly speaking, it just helps the processor stay busy. That being said, media applications tend to benefit from SMT more than most. If the OP is really looking for a very fast processor, and is willing to break the bank for it, I don't think its irrational to spring for an i7 (or a 1700x/1800x Ryzen).
     
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  6. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Granted, overclocking is easy these days. It still doesn't mean that people should do it unless they have a good reason for it and understand the possible issues. The average user who simply wants a computer that works and is not technically minded probably should not do it. Not everyone who comes here asking about a build is technically minded enough to recommend that it be done. It has always been the unofficial position in these forums not to recommend it out of the blue, only discuss it with users that are interested in it.
     
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  7. Khalil

    Khalil 计算机超级技术

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    Nothing he listed will benefit from an i7 processor. If you are not going to virtualize, you don't need Hyper Threading. a 6th Gen i5 will meet and exceed his requirements.
    To put it into prospective, my AMD 1700X is running 5 operating systems in a virtual environment 24/7 with 64GB of Ram it runs like a charm.
    At home, my gaming rig has an AMD 1400 and it is all I will need because I do not use VM on it.
     
  8. reggie14

    reggie14

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    While I agree Hyperthreading is overrated, it does help a variety of multi-threaded applications, and will generally help with multi-tasking. The basic idea of SMT is that a core can switch between running instructions from two different threads without having to do a context switch.

    Virtualization is certainly an example of a situation where SMT is often helpful, but heavily threaded multimedia applications, like video editing, tend to benefit from SMT. That's why a Core i7 7700 (non-K) does better in a variety of benchmarks than a Core i5 7600K.

    The big question is whether the added performance in a handful of situations is actually worth the added cost. And that simply depends on what you're doing and what the cost difference is.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017