New Gaming Rig (Dual Vega 64) - Suggestions Wanted

Discussion in 'Build Your Own PC' started by travelhead, Oct 10, 2017.

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  1. travelhead

    travelhead

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    Building a custom gaming rig for Quake Champions and looking for some feedback if my configuration will work:

    • COSMOS C700P E-ATX Full-Tower
    • Cooler Master V1200 - Fully Modular 1200W 80 PLUS Platinum PSU with Silent Fanless
    • CORSAIR Hydro Series H105 Extreme Performance 240mm Liquid CPU Cooler, CW-9060016-WW
    • Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver Thermal Compound AS5-3.5G
    • Mushkin Enhanced Blackline 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 2400 (PC4 19200)
    • ASUS Prime X299-Deluxe LGA 2066 Intel X299 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.1 ATX Intel Motherboard
    • Intel Core i9-7900X Skylake-X 10-Core 3.3 GHz LGA 2066 140W BX80673I97900X
    • SAMSUNG 960 EVO M.2 1TB NVMe PCI-Express 3.0 x4 Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-V6E1T0BW
    • Windows 10 Pro
    Going for 2 of the below cards (dual):
    • XFX Radeon RX VEGA 64 DirectX 12 RXVEGMTBFX6 8GB 2048-Bit HBM2 PCI Express 3.0 CrossFireX Support
    Also, since I'm getting 2 VEGA 64 GPU's, does my Mobo support it? Do I need to do anything else to support a Crossfire GPU setup?
     
  2. SpencerC

    SpencerC

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    Woah, hold on there. You are overspending on way too many parts.

    1) You don't need 2 Vega 64 GPU's in Crossfire. Developer support is rather poor, and the added cost is almost never worth it

    2) You don't need a 7900X. Skylake-X and Threadripper are designed for the workstation space, not gaming per se.

    3) What is your current budget? Considering that you can get GTX 1080's for much cheaper than any Vega GPU is going at why not go with that? Also, what region do you live in? (USA, Canada, Europe, Australia etc.)

    4) Here are my recommended changes with some explanations:

    PCPartPicker part list: System Builder - Ryzen 7 1700X 3.4GHz 8-Core, GeForce GTX 1080 8GB FTW Gaming ACX 3.0, Define C TG ATX Mid Tower - PCPartPicker
    Price breakdown by merchant: System Builder - Ryzen 7 1700X 3.4GHz 8-Core, GeForce GTX 1080 8GB FTW... - Prices By Merchant - PCPartPicker

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700X 3.4GHz 8-Core Processor ($298.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Thermalright - TRUE Spirit 140 Direct 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($44.90 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: Asus - STRIX X370-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($173.89 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($169.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($233.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Toshiba - X300 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($124.99 @ Other World Computing)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB FTW Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card ($529.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Fractal Design - Define C TG ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro Full 32/64-bit ($189.00 @ B&H)
    Total: $1924.61
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-10 15:46 EDT-0400

    The 1700X is a perfectly capable gaming CPU that should last you for many years to come and can also be upgraded to future versions of Zen. As you asked about Crossfire/SLI support, yes, both the X370 and X299 chipsets allow for that with X370 allowing for a X8/X8 PCIE Gen 3 setup and X299 allowing for a X16/X16 PCIE Gen 3 setup as long as you use a 7900X or up (which is ridiculous). You also do not need above 16GB for gaming right now, as nothing will really take advantage of more quite yet. I split the storage up into 2 different devices, a 4TB hard drive for all your applications, programs, and documents plus a 500GB NVME SSD for your operating system and games. I put down the GTX 1080 as you can actually lay your hands on one right now and they go for a cheaper asking price than Vega does at the moment. As for the case I put down the Fractal Design Define C, a compact mid-tower case that will more than suit your needs and is very flexible. The Seasonic Focus Plus 750w Gold is rated for 80+ Gold efficiency, short (coming in at 140mm), and fully modular, a basic requirement for any PSU nowadays in my opinion. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask!
     
  3. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    If you want to spend the money, you might as well get that 1TB NVMe SSD.

    If you are thinking you might want dual GPU's now or in the future, I'd up the PSU to a bit higher wattage. 750 is minimum for a pair of 1080's. The Seasonic Focus is an excellent choice in any wattage. Cooler Master PSU's aren't that good.

    I don't see any reason why you couldn't use that case and liquid cooler with a Ryzen system, as long as the cooler will fit an AM4.

    I also don't see why you couldn't get 32gb ram if you want it, I concur with the high speed Vengeance on a Ryzen system, just get a 2x16gb kit.

    Now, in the interest of fairness, if you prefer Intel, I'd get an i7-8700K with an appropriate Asus Z370 motherboard, and Vengeance 1.2 volt DDR4-2666 or 2800 ram. Yes, it costs more than the Ryzen and the 8700K is in short supply right now, but it's an excellent gaming CPU. X299 and Skylake-X is just a waste and it's on its way out.
     
  4. SpencerC

    SpencerC

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    Hmm, I'm legitimately curious right now. Why would Skylake-X "be on its way out" when Intel just recently released their highest core counts in the 7960X and 7980XE? Also, dual GPU's are pretty pointless now due to NVIDIA and AMD distancing themselves from their previous "SLI" and "Crossfire" commitments in favor of DX12 multi-GPU implementations.
     
  5. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    I misspoke. My apologies.

    So - if the budget can stand it, why not a single 1080 Ti? I'm thinking that if the OP was willing to go with an i9 and dual Vegas, a single 1080 Ti and either a high end Ryzen or Coffee Lake would be a lot more cost-effective for gaming.
     
  6. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    Unless you are getting a 4K monitor, two 1080's is overkill.

    Right now I have a 1080 card and a 4K monitor and it is adequate for gaming, barely...50-60 FPS for more graphically intensive games. What I mean by adequate is 60 FPS at Ultra settings.

    A single 1080 works well up to about a 3k monitor. A single 1080Ti will power a 4K monitor for gaming just fine up to 60 FPS on Ultra settings. A 1080Ti has about 30% more graphics processing power than a 1080.

    The technology (bandwidth) does not yet exist to drive a true 4K (4096 x 2160) monitor over 60 FPS yet. The next major iteration of Display Port will have that ability.

    So really, as glc is recommending, a single 1080Ti is all you could possibly use.....until the technology for delivering more bandwidth increases. When that occurs and you have the monitor or monitors for it, then consider a second 1080Ti graphics card.

    Personally, I can't wait to see my flight sims on three 4K monitors! I'm gonna have to buy a bigger desk. :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
  7. reggie14

    reggie14

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    The GTX 10 series supports DisplayPort 1.4, which is capable of [email protected] The problem is, there are no 120/144hz 4k monitors yet, probably due to delays in the production of the panels. They're expected to come out Q1 2018. I'm not sure the Nvidia firmware actually supports DisplayPort 1.4 yet, but I bet it will by the time those monitors are released.

    I definitely agree with the recommendations in this thread. A single GTX 1080 Ti is a better choice than dual, slower GPUs. I don't think we know if Quake Champions will support DX12 multi-GPU. I don't even think the current preview release even supports SLI/CrossFire. So, we definitely don't know how well it will scale with dual GPUs, if at all.

    While I think either a high-end Ryzen or Intel CPU would be fine, the early benchmarks suggest the Quake Champions doesn't benefit from more than 4 cores. That suggests the Intel chips will have a slight theoretical advantage, albeit one that may not translate to higher frame rates in practices. If the OP is buying something very soon, the limited availability of the 8700k must be considered. It looks like it will be at least several weeks, possibly a couple months, before you can easily get an 8700k.
     
  8. Khalil

    Khalil 计算机超级技术

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    I would stick to one Vega. Look into the AMD Ryzen 1800X best processor in the world for the buck. I have built 5 Machines with the Vega64 and I am very impressed. As SpencerC suggested, the 2 Vegas will be a total waste of your money.
    Benchmarks show the 1080 Ti to be a better faster card however my own bench marks show better results with the Vega 64

    Great advice.

    As far as a Power Supply which is the single most Important component in your rig this is the power supply you want to protect your investment.

    Seasonic FOCUS Plus Series SSR-850PX 850W 80+ Platinum ATX12V & EPS12V Full Modular 120mm FDB Fan 10 Years Warranty Compact 140 mm Size Power Supply - Newegg.com
     
  9. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    Really nice PSU. That's the one I was looking at for my next build. Really nice price as well.
     
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