How To Avoid Potential Computer Problems By Researching Windows Patches

Discussion in 'PCMech Articles and Discussion' started by Floppyman, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. Floppyman

    Floppyman Administrator Staff Member

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    In this article, Brad makes the case for first researching Microsoft KB patches before allowing Windows to apply them. As there have been a few troublesome patches in the past, this could potentially save someone the headache of having navigate through bugs, or worse having to restore/reinstall the operating system.

    How to avoid potential computer problems by researching Windows patches - PCMech
     
  2. Petef56

    Petef56

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    I agree with one thing mentioned in this article and that has to do with creating an IMAGE BACKUP to protect against Windows Updates that often cause serious problems to the OS.

    With Win7, you can easily create a separate partition on your OS hard drive for the Image Backup within a few minutes and then perform the Image Backup within 20 to 40 minutes on a system that was 50 GB or less. With Win7 you could also check for updates and then review & hide a particular Windows Update with a couple of clicks. However, you cannot do either of these things with Win10, at least not without doing a lot of extra work. Why????...Because Win10 is a horrible OS.

    With Win10, you are directed to create your Image Backup to an external drive only. Last time I tried it, it would not even allow the Image backup to a FLASH DRIVE, it had to be a hard drive. WHY NOT??? Yes, I understand the concept of "What would you do if the OS hard drive goes bad?", but I'm not buying into that bogus excuse because most all new PCs do not come with recover media and rely upon a recovery partition on the same drive as the OS. So why won't Win10 allow us to create an IMAGE BACKUP to a separate partition on the OS hard drive?

    As for hiding certain updates in Win10, it can be done, but you have to DL and run a separate program called the "Show or hide updates" troubleshooter for Windows 10. How dumb is that? I'm finding that the most critical or important things I need to do as a tech in Win10 take so much more time and effort than Win7. That's why you will often hear me saying that Win7 is a great OS, but Win10 is the worse I've ever seen. And that's for a variety of reasons besides all the problems that the Win10 updates create.

    "Show or hide updates" troubleshooter for Windows 10....
    http://download.microsoft.com/download/F/2/2/F22D5FDB-59CD-4275-8C95-1BE17BF70B21/wushowhide.diagcab

    In Win7 it was a rare occasion that the Updates caused problems, but with Win10 it's frequent. After all, the updates are supposed to keep the system running smoothly and securely. Not so with Win10, as evident by suggestions that we need to research updates and somehow stop them before they can do harm. This is the insanity of Win10!

    --pete--
     
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  3. Bob338

    Bob338

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    You're right on Pete!!

    I liked W10 pretty well initially but the updates have caused me to spend more time straightening things out not only on the OS but on other programs the updates seem to affect. Maybe if I were a more knowledgeable user these changes to my settings wouldn't be so bothersome. I have to research every time I have to reset changes since I'm only working on two computers and I can't remember how I did on little change two months ago. I'm on the fence now about going back to W7. I've had an external hard drive on my desk for the backup of the OS but I keep vacillating about going back to W7, and besides, I'd have to do a bunch more research to even do either. Stuck with "negative inertia"!!
     
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  4. Petef56

    Petef56

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    Perhaps Microsoft feels that they don't need to test things or develop with care before releasing updates. The consumers have unwittingly become beta testers who often bear the costs of lost productivity on their Win10 computers when the updates create problems or waste hours of time installing. I wonder how things would be if Microsoft was fined or ordered to pay damages each time their updates caused problems.

    --pete--
     
  5. Bob338

    Bob338

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    My #2 son who has a Master's in computer science and gives seminars on programming, told me years ago that Microsoft used us all as testers and they had a very limited staff for that. He opined it was by design. I believe it!
     
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  6. bob

    bob

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    They had a test division. The medical insurance for nervous disorders forced them to disband it.
    [A joke] :)
     
  7. auen1

    auen1

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    Isn't that a smart way to do business?

    Are they stupid for selling their business plan
    or are we stupid for buying their product?

    That is the question.
     
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