Early Coffee Lake Benchmarks are In

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware' started by reggie14, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. reggie14

    reggie14

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    Anandtech: The AnandTech Coffee Lake Review: Initial Numbers on the Core i7-8700K and Core i5-8400

    Tom's Hardware: Core i7-8700K Review: Coffee Lake Brews A Great Gaming CPU

    Ars Technica: Intel Coffee Lake Core i7-8700K review: The best gaming CPU you can buy

    TweakTown: Intel CPUs Intel Core i7-8700K and i5-8400 Coffee Lake CPU Review

    The results are pretty much what you'd expect. Single core performance is pretty similar to Kaby Lake. But, while the 8700k has a slightly higher turbo frequency, the extra cores make it harder to reliably maintain performance, probably due to down-clocking and core switching. This is similar to some of the challenges the Ryzen faced, and can probably be mitigated a bit with CPU driver and Windows scheduler improvements. Still, we didn't see a dramatic shift with the Ryzen, and I don't expect to here.

    The extra cores obviously do help in most situations. Gaming performance appears to be generally up, though in practice I think you'd be hard-pressed to notice a difference over the 7700k. The big difference is really in highly-threaded applications, like rendering and encoding, where the extra cores nearly destroy the advantage the Ryzen's had.

    I still think the Ryzen is an impressive chip, but this certainly puts the pressure on AMD to drop prices. The current $100 price cuts for the 1800X an 1700X will presumably be made permanent, and I think they'll have to cut the 1600 and 1500 chips, too. But, the Ryzen chips are probably pretty expensive, due to their large die size. And given that AMD has to contract out fabrication, I wonder how much flexibility they have on price.
     
  2. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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  3. SpencerC

    SpencerC

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    Coffee Lake was paper launched today, like most products are. Performance looks good, but jumping on the "Ryzen is automatically garbage" train because of these results is a weak excuse in my opinion. Granted, Intel has finally gotten off the quad core train they have been on for the past decade, and the performance is good, but Zen as an architecture is still very capable (and has several revisions planned, all on the AM4 socket, mind you).
     
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  4. reggie14

    reggie14

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    I'm not sure what you mean. Are you suggesting that the early benchmarks aren't going to reflect reality? Or that there's going to be a significant delay getting these into the market? It's not just a paper launch- people were able to buy even the 8700km they just sold out rather quickly. We'll see over the next couple of weeks whether Intel can keep up with demand.

    I never said Zen is garbage. We'll see where AMD can go with it. I hope they'll be able to ramp-up the clock speeds next year on the high-end (since major IPC improvements are unlikely. And I hope Raven Ridge meets/beats expectations, too. But for now, depending on where prices fall, it looks like there will be a smaller set of users out there that will truly get more bang-for-their-buck from AMD compared to Intel.
     
  5. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    What Reggie just said is Coffee Lake is a noticeable improvement over Kaby Lake and is going to put more of a pinch on AMD.
     
  6. SpencerC

    SpencerC

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    That was a pretty badly worded statement, I will agree. What I was trying to say is that many people across the internet (not specifically here) have already developed the opinion that Ryzen is utter garbage, just because a heavily overclocked i7 beats the 1800x in a few situations. Coffee Lake is a good step forward, but Ryzen is still a perfectly acceptable CPU choice.
     
  7. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    The better AMD does, the more that Intel is forced to lower their prices. I'm all for both.
     
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  8. Khalil

    Khalil 计算机超级技术

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    These Benchmarks are mostly bought and paid for. The differences between 5th, 6th, 7th and now the 8th Gen are so minimal they are not worth it for most consumers. Good marketing by Intel though.
     
  9. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    I have been saying that for a while, the laws of physics are getting in the way of making notable leaps in processing power between generations of CPU's. Moores Law no longer applies.

    The die shrinks are down to the point where if they go much smaller then electrons can jump the lanes. The removal of waste heat and core frequency is maxed out as well. The only direction left to take processors is more cores and more onboard memory. We see that already.

    In a way, it is kind of a relief for the consumer. When the next generation of processors comes along and you have the last generation....pretty soon if not now, it will make very little if any difference.

    To somewhat parallel what Khalil says, marketing for the next generation of CPU's will amount to a bunch of meaningless hype.

    On the other hand, new generations of GPU's still have some meaningful leaps in power. I wonder if and when that curve will start leveling out?
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017