Brake Rotor Problem

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by SARGE, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. Blaster3

    Blaster3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    2,692
    Location:
    Long Island
    allowing cedar to grey naturally conceals the streaks...
     
  2. SARGE

    SARGE The Preacher Man

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2000
    Messages:
    7,445
    Location:
    Texas
    I've heard of people spraying a new fence with baking soda to lighten the color up. Doesn't make sense.
     
  3. bob

    bob

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 1999
    Messages:
    4,856
    Location:
    LA, CA
    It has some bleaching abilities and it is white. :)
     
  4. Blaster3

    Blaster3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    2,692
    Location:
    Long Island
    they bought red cedar to bleach it white??? they could've just bought white cedar
     
  5. bob

    bob

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 1999
    Messages:
    4,856
    Location:
    LA, CA
    All wood gets dark but red looks nicer if maintained. It is so easy to spray Thompson's or (if available) wood preservative but most people just do not do it once a year as required.
     
    SARGE likes this.
  6. SARGE

    SARGE The Preacher Man

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2000
    Messages:
    7,445
    Location:
    Texas
    Hard to beat red cedar in fencing and worth preserving best you can.
     
  7. SARGE

    SARGE The Preacher Man

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2000
    Messages:
    7,445
    Location:
    Texas
    I love it ! Been a week beginning with a pic of a brake rotor, moved on to aluminum cylinder heads and screws, different types of metals, marine metals and now on cedar fences and how to keep them red or stained white. I love this place. As an aside, my little brother finished his brake job last Sunday, lol.
     
  8. bob

    bob

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 1999
    Messages:
    4,856
    Location:
    LA, CA
    I recently fixed a sealed water heater with a roofing nail. But that is another story.
     
  9. SARGE

    SARGE The Preacher Man

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2000
    Messages:
    7,445
    Location:
    Texas
    Well, we all gotta hear that one...
     
  10. bob

    bob

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 1999
    Messages:
    4,856
    Location:
    LA, CA
    There is a part (discontinued and no replacement part) that holds down a plate that lets the air in from the bottom. It breaks and shuts off the intake air.
    Makes it look like the thermocouple failed. Once replaced it looks like the gas shutoff valve failed.
    Nope - replaced them and the gas shut off. But it was not the gas but there was no air.
    Some genius designed a clamp that would break and shut off the air. About 1 inch of glass composite. It failed when I sprayed the area with ant spray.
    It was supposed to fail when bad gasses built up.
    I replaced it with a nail to hold the plate open and installed a smoke alarm with a carbon monoxide detector.
    Now I have hot water instead of a $1000 bill.
    I like my 50gal heater - never runs out no matter how long I shower.
     
  11. David M

    David M Techphile.

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2003
    Messages:
    9,201
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay
    As David said,

    Be careful using Stainless in "Aluminum" cylinder heads. This has heat cycles and constant moisture issues and using stainless in aluminum cylinder heads is a big no no The stainless will gall and seize faster than regular steel. In boats on salt water it may be different but autos its totally bad.... unless you like drilling out busted off stainless bolts.

    I never said in aluminum heads. I know little about automotive stuff, just about boats and marine related stuff. Stainless is actually a softer metal than automotive grade bolts. And yeah, stainless will seize up quite easily.

    I have had stainless steel bolts seize into stainless steel nuts so badly that even an impact wrench would not remove it. I had to remove it with a cutting wheel.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  12. David M

    David M Techphile.

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2003
    Messages:
    9,201
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay
    A mild acid will put wood back to its original color, usually diluted out phosphoric acid. A mild base will "bleach" it....make it whiter. Baking soda is a base.
     
    SARGE likes this.
  13. Blaster3

    Blaster3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    2,692
    Location:
    Long Island
    are you positive, look at post #22
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  14. David M

    David M Techphile.

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2003
    Messages:
    9,201
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay
    Yeah I'm sure. YOU Need to read it again. I never said threading a stainless steel bolt into an aluminum cylinder head. I did discuss threading stainless into other aluminum things, which I have plenty of times, but not an aluminum cylinder head.
     
  15. Blaster3

    Blaster3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    2,692
    Location:
    Long Island
    o_Oo_Oo_O
     
  16. David M

    David M Techphile.

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2003
    Messages:
    9,201
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay
    Go ahead and interpret it however you wish. You must also read minds.