First-time gaming rig builder needs help

Discussion in 'Build Your Own PC' started by riggeDDM2011, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    I'm completely new to building my own PC, so I've no clue what to do and was hoping I could get some advice. I'll primarily be using it for online gaming, but it'll also be used for Web-surfing, DVD-watching, and schoolwork. I'm building the entire thing from the ground up, and I'm hoping to spend less than $1,000 (not including OS and case). So I guess first thing is first: what information do I need to supply here to help you guys help me?
     
  2. djm227

    djm227

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    Welcome!

    I'm sure the experts will be around to help you, but in the mean time this thread will tell you what info to post.
     
  3. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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  4. Staren

    Staren

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    You should pick parts in this order:

    Processor > Motherboard > RAM > Video Card > Hard Drive > Media Drives (ie: CD/DVD, card reader, ect) > PSU

    Your motherboard is dependent on the CPU chosen, and RAM is dependent on the motherboard. You want to pick your PSU last because you will not know how many watts of power you will need until the rest of the system is picked out.
     
  5. jdeb

    jdeb

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    $909.00 not including any shipping. If you do not plan on overclocking you can omit the CM Hyper 212 EVO.

    Intel Core i5-2500K
    Newegg.com - Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000 BX80623I52500K

    COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO
    Newegg.com - COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R2 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 2011/1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+

    ASUS P8Z68-V LE
    Newegg.com - ASUS P8Z68-V LE LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

    CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
    Newegg.com - CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CML8GX3M2A1600C9B

    EVGA SuperClocked 01G-P3-1461-KR GeForce GTX 560
    Newegg.com - EVGA SuperClocked 01G-P3-1461-KR GeForce GTX 560 (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

    HITACHI Deskstar 7K1000.D HDS721050DLE630 (0F13178) 500GB
    Newegg.com - HITACHI Deskstar 7K1000.D HDS721050DLE630 (0F13178) 500GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

    Intel 320 Series SSDSA2CT040G3K5 2.5" 40GB SATA II
    Newegg.com - Intel 320 Series SSDSA2CT040G3K5 2.5" 40GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

    LITE-ON DVD Burner
    Newegg.com - LITE-ON DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model iHAS124-04 - CD / DVD Burners

    SeaSonic S12II 620 Bronze 620W
    Newegg.com - SeaSonic S12II 620 Bronze 620W ATX12V V2.3 / EPS 12V V2.91 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
     
  6. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    Thanks for the tips and recommendations, guys! I was wondering: is overclocking safe? Will it make a drastic difference in my gaming experience? The case I'm getting (mentioned above) has 4 fans, but is that not enough to keep the CPU and everything else cool?
     
  7. Staren

    Staren

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    Overclocking can make a bit of a deference, but it takes some practice as well. I wouldn't count on a huge performance jump for your first try at it.

    Stock case fans would be fine. It's the CPU and GPU cooling systems that have a real effect on overclocking.

    Is it safe? That's kind of a subjective answer. If your willing to put in the time to learn and treat it like a hobby, then it can be. If you just have the goal of speeding up a computer and don't enjoy the process, it might not be. You can do damage if you aren't careful, and a lot of people have fried systems by pushing settings too far.
     
  8. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    I see, I'll do more research and consider overclocking. Faster performance is always tempting :) A had a question about the mobo jdeb referred to and one that my friend is considering getting for his next build. What is the difference between the one above and this one:

    ASUS P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS Newegg.com - ASUS P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

    The latter costs more, but is the V-PRO superior to the V-LE?
     
  9. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Yes, it has PCI-E 3.0 and can run 2 video cards in Crossfire/SLI without one slot being slow. It also has more SATA 6.0 ports. If you will only be using one PCI-E 2.x video card and you don't need more than 2 SATA 6.0 ports, the LE is all you need.
     
  10. David M

    David M Techphile.

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    Oerclocking is pretty safe with cores that shut down on their own if they start to overheat. With newer cores, overall, don't expect much gain in gaming performance. Although there are some newer games now which are somewhat more CPU dependent like Skyrim. But the bottom line is that gaming performance is primarily dependent on your graphics card.
     
  11. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    Thanks guys, I'm REALLY starting to understand more about the intricacies of a PC's hardware :)

    About the SSD; is it necessary to have if I have a spacious HDD, or is it more of a luxury part? I don't think I understand what it can really offer compared to the HDD, and why it costs much more $ per gig.
     
  12. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    A SSD is a luxury. It makes the machine boot up much faster, and can make programs open faster.
     
  13. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    Also, how do I find out what kind of voltage a mobo like the Asus mentioned above can safely handle from a RAM? I'm looking at G.SKILL Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR2 Newegg.com - G.SKILL Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR2 currently, and some reviews warn that you should really make sure your mobo can handle the voltage when OC'ing I think.

    Additionally, this version Newegg.com - G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 14900) Desktop Memory Model F3-14900CL9D-8GBSR is $10 more, has slightly slower timing and is 1.5V, but runs faster at 1866. I can spend that much more for even better performance, but is it worth it?
     
  14. Staren

    Staren

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    First off, G.Skill has dropped off of the unwritten recommended list for RAM manufacturers. They've had quality issues. There is a small list of solid brands, Corsair, Kingston, Crucial, and ADATA. G.Skill used to be in a small group of second tier brands, but they've dropped the ball for awhile.

    Voltage is normally a non-issue. It really only comes into play when overclocking, and sometimes for specialized motherboards. In general you should stick to the standard voltage models.

    As for the speed question, you can buy one speed step higher then your motherboard is rated for if you;d like to do some overclocking. Any higher however will not improve anything. Motherboards can only transfer data into RAM so fast. Faster RAM beyond maybe one step faster for overclocking, will do thing for performance.
     
  15. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    The best ram for a Z68 board is 1.5 volt Corsair Vengeance 1600 low profile.
     
  16. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    I'm considering going with the ASUS P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOSNewegg.com - ASUS P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS, so that I leave the option of going SLI open in the future. Will the Seasonic PSU listed above be able to handle SLI comfortably, or will I need a more powerful one? Also, with this mobo, should I upgrade the video card to one with PCI-E 3.0, or should I just wait until I'm ready to go SLI?
     
  17. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    No 620 is certified for SLI for any pair of serious video cards.

    PCI-E 2.0 cards will work fine on a 3.0 board.
     
  18. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    Ok, awesome. How about my HDD? With the V-PRO board, will I get better efficiency from a 64 MB cache, or is the improved performance insignificant compared to the 32 MB cache?
     
  19. glc

    glc Forum Administrator Staff Member

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    Right now isn't a good time to be fussy about hard drives, with the prices the way they are. If you use the recommended hard drive along with the recommended SSD using SRT, you will be fine.
     
  20. riggeDDM2011

    riggeDDM2011

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    I heard, though, that if using SRT, it's more reliable to use SLC drives rather than MLC? Will SLC drives last longer than MLC ones using SRT?
     

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